--> Calyx
gothlesterol:

Oh Dear heart.

gothlesterol:

Oh Dear heart.

blastedheath:

David Hockney (British, b. 1937), Mere Ubu, 1966. Crayon, paper and fabric collage on paper, 27.3 x 24.1 cm.
Costume design for the 1966 production of Alfred Jarry’s Ubu Roi at the Royal Court Theatre, London.

blastedheath:

David Hockney (British, b. 1937), Mere Ubu, 1966. Crayon, paper and fabric collage on paper, 27.3 x 24.1 cm.

Costume design for the 1966 production of Alfred Jarry’s Ubu Roi at the Royal Court Theatre, London.

cheese3d:

i think i can accurately say that i can crush a man’s head with my thighs

nativeamericannews:

Revisiting Johnny Cash’s classic Indian rights recording
You’re forgiven if you’ve never heard or even heard of Johnny Cash’s brilliant 1964 concept album, Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It wasn’t one of his best sellers, though one of its key tracks, “The Ballad of Ira Hayes”, would become a fair-sized hit. Without knowing the album’s history, the more cynical among us might believe that it was released a decade later, as some kind of a cash-in on halfhearted environmentalism and a popular sense of civil rights. You might even think that it was a grasp at capturing a younger audience, one that was convinced that all of us have Native American blood coursing through our veins.

nativeamericannews:

Revisiting Johnny Cash’s classic Indian rights recording

You’re forgiven if you’ve never heard or even heard of Johnny Cash’s brilliant 1964 concept album, Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It wasn’t one of his best sellers, though one of its key tracks, “The Ballad of Ira Hayes”, would become a fair-sized hit. Without knowing the album’s history, the more cynical among us might believe that it was released a decade later, as some kind of a cash-in on halfhearted environmentalism and a popular sense of civil rights. You might even think that it was a grasp at capturing a younger audience, one that was convinced that all of us have Native American blood coursing through our veins.

cinoh:

asylum-art:

The Rose de Jéricho (Anastatica hierochuntica) is a species of desert moss that has the amazing ability to ‘resurrect’ itself after bouts of extreme dehydration lasting months or even years. After just a few hours of exposure to moisture the plants burst to life, uncurling from a tight ball of dry leaves to a green flower-like shape. Videographer Sean Steininger shot this timelapse of several plants as he exposed them to water.

Watch  the video:

A time lapse of a Rose of Jericho . After being exposed to water, the plant turns from a dried tumbleweed to a green fern over the course of several hour.


Vintage witch

Vintage witch

1910-again:

2headedsnake:

flickr.com:photos:felixlabisse
1957 ‘Simon le magician’ by Felix Labisse

Felix Labisse, Simon le Magician 1957

1910-again:

2headedsnake:

flickr.com:photos:felixlabisse

1957 ‘Simon le magician’ by Felix Labisse

Felix Labisse, Simon le Magician 1957

I think it’s weird that teenage girls know more about giving blowjobs than they do about masturbation. It makes me sick to my stomach that so many young girls think sex is just about a guy finishing.
Anonymous said:
Can you like please adopt me or something cause honestly your blog has had such an impact on my life as a black girl. Like, I love everything about this. I just want you to know that you matter, not only as a black woman, not only as a trans black woman, but because you try to make people aware of shit going on with our people that others turn a blind eye to. You are a true spirit 😚
When a man says “females” this is the kind of person we see.

selchieproductions:

The photos above were all taken by Edward Sheriff Curtis, a man who by a large number of white ethnographers has been described as something of a super hero, but who, in reality, was a terrible contributor to the tired, old-fashioned idea of Native Americans as homogenous, history-less people, stuck in the past.

Hipster chicks wearing war bonnets? Blame Curtis.

Topshop selling ‘Native inspired clothes’ that have little or nothing to do with real, native fashion? Blame Curtis.

Curtis’s photos are great examples of how indigenous people have been and continue to be othered by the West, through a discourse where they’re turned into objects, rather than subjects and I believe the photos above are rather telling examples of how Edward S. Curtis documentation of ‘dying cultures’ had fuck all to do with reality and everything to do with a romantic idea of Native Americans as the proverbial noble savages that had to be saved by the white man.

Just have a look at the shirt worn by the four different men in the photos above. Two of these men come from the same tribe, the other two are members of different branches of the Sioux Očhéthi Šakówiŋ. 

Yes, you’re right, it is indeed the same hide shirt, because Curtis was a wanker who staged all his photos and deliberately made people look like his idea of what a Native American would look like, rather than actually depicting the reality of Native Americans’ lives.

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